CoffeeShop Rosy Vintage Tutorial


Today I wanted to post a new Photoshop/PSE vintage editing tutorial.  I have posted the action to go along with this tutorial here.

This is a fun little editing technique to get a high contrast pink-tinted selectively-colored image.
I know you have all seen the not-so-subtle selective coloring effect, but I wanted to show that it is possible to use selective coloring in very pretty and subtle way.  You can also skip the masking part of this tutorial if you want a simple vintage pink-tinted B&W image.

Mouse over the image to see the CoffeeShop Rosy Vintage effect!




So let's begin!


1.  Open your image.  I love this effect with simple light-colored backgrounds (like bathrooms).  This would also be a fun way to edit Christmas ornament or flower arrangement images.  I also love it on portraits.


2.  Add a Levels adjustment layer without making any changes on the sliders and put this layer in Screen blending mode.  Your image will be blown-out, but don't worry.  You can adjust the opacity of this layer at the end of the edit.


3.  Add a black to white Gradient Map adjustment layer for a simple B&W conversion.


4.  Now we add the tint.  I added a Color-Fill adjustment layer on top (hex# f5e3d9, peachy rosy color) for this edit, but you can play around to find your favorite tint.  It doesn't even have to be pink.  ;-)


5.  Put this layer in Multiply blending mode.  Stop here if you want a simple tinted B&W.  Adjust the Levels and Color Fill layer opacities to taste.  Continue if you want to selectively-color the image.

I think  Duke's eyes are a bit too dark, and if I had time to repeat this edit I would use a Levels adjustment layer to adjust the shadows and add a black layer mask and then paint out the eyes.


6.  Click to select the B&W Gradient Map layer mask.  Then click B to select your brush tool, make sure it is soft, and start with an opacity of 50% or so.  Use a higher opacity if you want more color showing through, less if you want a very subtle color pop.  Now paint over the areas on the image you wish to add back color.  I did a quick and dirty paint over the boys.

Note:  Make sure to keep holding down your mouse button as you paint over the entire image.  If you paint over one part at 50% and then release the mouse button and finish painting and overlap an area already painted, the color will be too intense in that area.


7.  Here is a nifty trick to see how well you painted.  While holding down shift-alt, click on the layer mask and your painted areas will show up red on the image.  You can see where I went over the lines and missed a few places.

Click on B for brush, make it white and hard, and bring the opacity up to 100% and paint over the areas that  have spilled over.  Then use a soft black low opacity brush to paint in areas you missed. Then hold down shift-alt and click on the layer mask to remove the red.


8. My image is now cleaned up.  I think I will add a texture.


9.  I used a Florabella texture from Set 1.  Just drag the texture on top of your image and then Ctrl-T to make it fit.


10.  I put the texture layer in Soft Light blending mode for a subtle  effect. Play with textures, you never know what will look great with your edit.

I hope you enjoy this tutorial!  I have posted the CoffeeShop Rosy Vintage action in another post.  This action only has Step 1-5, you will have to mask and add the texture on your own. :-)  I also am going to post more digital paper, digital tape, frames and storyboards in the next weeks.  I have a huge folder of WIP's (works-in-progress) that I need to go through.  :-)

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3 Comments:

ginger springer photography December 6, 2011 at 9:03 PM  

This one cracks me up. Look at the wrinkles on their feet. Now that's some clean little men.

Jessica December 6, 2011 at 9:36 PM  

I really admire your ability to "envision" the outcome of the photo. I'm struggling with this right now: What I see in my head is not always what I get to manifest. Kudos to you (and practice, practice, practice for me).

Léa December 8, 2011 at 3:49 AM  

Thank you for sharing your kindness.